Hodgepodge

This is some stuff I like.




garfieldminusgarfield:

G-G the book - G-G on Facebook - G-G on Twitter

garfieldminusgarfield:

G-G the book - G-G on Facebook - G-G on Twitter



nprfreshair:

"All I want is education, and I am afraid of no one."
Malala Yousafzai as Rosie the Riveter. 

nprfreshair:

"All I want is education, and I am afraid of no one."

Malala Yousafzai as Rosie the Riveter. 



slaughterhouse90210:

“To say a person is a happy person or an unhappy person is ridiculous. We are a thousand different kinds of people every hour.”― Anthony Doerr, Memory Wall

slaughterhouse90210:

“To say a person is a happy person or an unhappy person is ridiculous. We are a thousand different kinds of people every hour.”
― Anthony Doerr, Memory Wall


oupacademic:





oldflorida:

Lake Mizell

oldflorida:

Lake Mizell



natgeofound:

The shadow of an aircraft over the Saudi desert, November 1986.Photograph by Jodi Cobb, National Geographic Creative

natgeofound:

The shadow of an aircraft over the Saudi desert, November 1986.Photograph by Jodi Cobb, National Geographic Creative


oupacademic:

n. Blanket.

Image: Blanket. Public Domain via Pixabay.




oupacademic:





ari-abroad:

We were having lunch in Ashkelon when the air raid sirens went off. Everyone ran for cover, then went back to eating a few minutes later. via Instagram

ari-abroad:

We were having lunch in Ashkelon when the air raid sirens went off. Everyone ran for cover, then went back to eating a few minutes later. via Instagram

(via npr)



nprfreshair:

The Haunting Beauty of World War II Bomb Craters by Henning Rogge via City Lab

"Little evidence exists of the violence that created such landscapes. Rogge’s photographs of these places point to this disconnect—the way violent histories can later appear as placid sites of remembrance. In their pairing of current serenity with past rupture, he asks the viewer to consider the healing effect of time: If this scarred landscape has recovered from the war’s violence, can a country, or a person, heal in the same way?”

nprfreshair:

The Haunting Beauty of World War II Bomb Craters by Henning Rogge via City Lab

"Little evidence exists of the violence that created such landscapes. Rogge’s photographs of these places point to this disconnect—the way violent histories can later appear as placid sites of remembrance. In their pairing of current serenity with past rupture, he asks the viewer to consider the healing effect of time: If this scarred landscape has recovered from the war’s violence, can a country, or a person, heal in the same way?”