Hodgepodge

This is some stuff I like.




slaughterhouse90210:

“Seldom, very seldom, does complete truth belong to any human disclosure; seldom can it happen that something is not a little disguised or a little mistaken.”― Jane Austen, Emma

slaughterhouse90210:

“Seldom, very seldom, does complete truth belong to any human disclosure; seldom can it happen that something is not a little disguised or a little mistaken.”
― Jane Austen, Emma




nprchives:

Here’s some excellent archival research by NPR’s Code Switch team (with help from NPR librarian Katie Daugert on blacks passing as East Indian or using “exotica” to navigate the Jim Crow South. This perspective complicates the conversations trending on the Internet about cultural appropriation. 

"I was Jim Crowed here, Jim Crowed there, Jim Crowed all over the place. And I didn’t like being Jim Crowed." —- Jesse Routté, who pulled off what historian Paul Kramer calls the “turban trick.”

At the time, ideas of race in America were quite literally black and white. But a few meters of cloth changed the way some people of color were treated.

(via npr)



skunkbear:

The recent release of “Dawn of the Planet of the Apes" reminded me of one of my favorite ape vs. man films – this 1932 video that shows a baby chimpanzee and a baby human undergoing the same basic psychological tests.

Its gets weirder – the human baby (Donald) and the chimpanzee baby (Gua) were both raised as humans by their biological/adopted father Winthrop Niles Kellogg.  Kellogg was a comparative psychologist fascinated by the interplay between nature and nurture, and he devised a fascinating (and questionably ethical) experiment to study it:

Suppose an anthropoid were taken into a typical human family at the day of birth and reared as a child. Suppose he were fed upon a bottle, clothed, washed, bathed, fondled, and given a characteristically human environment; that he were spoken to like the human infant from the moment of parturition; that he had an adopted human mother and an adopted human father.

First, Kellogg had to convince his pregnant wife he wasn’t crazy:

 …the enthusiasm of one of us met with so much resistance from the other that it appeared likely we could never come to an agreement upon whether or not we should even attempt such an undertaking.

She apparently gave in, because Donald and Gua were raised, for nine months, as brother and sister. Much like Caesar in the “Planet of the Apes” movies, Gua developed faster than her “brother,” and often outperformed him in tasks. But she soon hit a cognitive wall, and the experiment came to an end. (Probably for the best, as Donald had begun to speak chimpanzee.)

You can read more about Kellogg’s experiment, its legacy, and public reaction to it here.

(via npr)

{block:NoteCount21,212 notes

garfieldminusgarfield:

G-G the book - G-G on Facebook - G-G on Twitter

garfieldminusgarfield:

G-G the book - G-G on Facebook - G-G on Twitter



nprfreshair:

"All I want is education, and I am afraid of no one."
Malala Yousafzai as Rosie the Riveter. 

nprfreshair:

"All I want is education, and I am afraid of no one."

Malala Yousafzai as Rosie the Riveter. 



slaughterhouse90210:

“To say a person is a happy person or an unhappy person is ridiculous. We are a thousand different kinds of people every hour.”― Anthony Doerr, Memory Wall

slaughterhouse90210:

“To say a person is a happy person or an unhappy person is ridiculous. We are a thousand different kinds of people every hour.”
― Anthony Doerr, Memory Wall


oupacademic:





oldflorida:

Lake Mizell

oldflorida:

Lake Mizell



natgeofound:

The shadow of an aircraft over the Saudi desert, November 1986.Photograph by Jodi Cobb, National Geographic Creative

natgeofound:

The shadow of an aircraft over the Saudi desert, November 1986.Photograph by Jodi Cobb, National Geographic Creative


oupacademic:

n. Blanket.

Image: Blanket. Public Domain via Pixabay.